Tag Archives: Query

How to copy a large result set from SQL Server Management Studio to Excel

So you’ve tried copying and pasting the results of a query into an excel file only to get the out of memory exception. Now the fun starts!

There are multiple options to achieve copying data from SQL Server Management Studio to excel however most of them are a pain.

You’ve tried the save as option but the csv and text files have jumbled up content. You could use the Management Studio export function, but this is intended for physical tables not results sets and you might not have the permissions to create tables in the environment. You could use the bcp Utility but you’ve probably read leaving this option turned on represents a security risk. You could create an SSIS package . . . yeah that’s an efficient and effective option when you just want the damn results of an ad hoc query!!!

I’d suggest splitting the result set into chunks. You can then copy and paste the chunks into the excel file without running out of memory. Sure it’s kinda manual but trust me it’ll take less time than the options above.

I’d wager you probably only need the result set split into two, so you’ve to copy and paste twice rather than once. Not that big a deal right? I’ve even provided some code below that will really move things along.

Start by writing your query results into a temporary tablet called #QueryResult, for example SELECT * INTO #QueryResult FROM TableName.

Then all you need to do is determine how many segments you need. NTILE(n) is a function that allocates your output into n segments, each of the same size (give or take rounding when the number of rows isn’t divisible by n).

So this produces an output like:

Id Name Ntile
1 Mickey 1
2 Leo 1
3 Raph 2
4 Donnie 2

Start by leaving n set to the default of 2. Once the data is written to the table #QueryResult run the code below in the same SSMS window the temp table was created in. Running the code should produce the same number of returned result sets as the n value you provided. Use a higher n number to create more segments if you still run out of memory when you try to copy and paste the first segment.

/*
Write your query results to a temp table here
i.e. SELECT * INTO #QueryResult FROM TableName
*/
DECLARE @n INT
DECLARE @i INT

/*
Set n to how many segments/results set returned you need
*/
SET @n = 2
SET @i = 1

SELECT *
	,NTILE(@n) OVER (
		ORDER BY RowNum
		) AS NtileGroup
INTO #Export
FROM (
	SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
			ORDER BY (
					SELECT NULL
					)
			) AS RowNum
		,*
	FROM #QueryResult
	) AS a

WHILE @i <= @n
BEGIN
	SELECT *
	FROM #Export
	WHERE NtileGroup = @i
	ORDER BY RowNum ASC

	SET @i = @i + 1
END

DROP TABLE #QueryResult

DROP TABLE #Export

 

So that’s it, you should now be able to copy and paste your results. Maybe someday in the future Microsoft will add the option of saving results directly to excel . . .

How to assess T-SQL code quickly

I’m sure you’re an excellent SQL coder writing beautiful efficient queries, but your predecessor . . . well they might have just been lucky to have a job.

Going through someone else’s bad code is usually tiresome, tedious and often very confusing.

I’ve created the T-SQL Assessor excel file to help in this task.

DOWNLOAD (Dropbox link)

The assessor will colour code the sql to highlight the lines of importance. With the Key Word column you can then simply filter to words like INSERT, UPDATE, MERGE and EXEC to see where the data is going or filter the column by the word FROM to see where the data has come from.

To use the T-SQL Assessor file you will first have to format your code using Poor Man’s T-SQL Formatter. This excellent tool can be installed in Visual Studio, SQL Server Management Studio or Notepad++.

http://architectshack.com/PoorMansTSqlFormatter.ashx

You can also use the online option:

http://poorsql.com/

Poor Man’s T-SQL Formatter makes text that contains a SQL command a new line, so you can’t have INSERT and FROM on one line. This is what allows Excel formula’s to highlight the lines with key words as each line can only contain one key word, excluding comments.

Once the code is formatted simply paste it into the first sheet of the file, “SQL”.

That’s it, all the work is then done for you on the second sheet of the file, “SQL Assessed”

T-SQL Assessor is also great at preparing a report from a schema compare script created by Visual Studio. It’s very annoying Microsoft didn’t provide a way of exporting the comparison directly into excel the way Redgate did but this will help. Simply filter the file to only include the keywords.

DOWNLOAD (Dropbox link)

How to lookup SQL Server Jobs and get the job history with a query

Sometimes job history just won’t load in SQL Server Management Studio for one reason or another. One of the main reasons is that there are too many entries in the sysjobhistory table. The article here will help you resolve that problem. For a more immediate answer to the data you are looking for, like most things with SSMS, you can query the tables that contain this data directly.

For a permanent solution to bypassing SSMS I recommend using this stored procedure. If you just want a quick query see below.

If you want to get a job history for everything that has run over the last 7 days you can run the query below. Simply change the 7 to another number to go further back in time by days.

-- Variable Declarations 
DECLARE @PreviousDate DATETIME
DECLARE @Year VARCHAR(4)
DECLARE @Month VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @MonthPre VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @Day VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @DayPre VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @FinalDate INT


-- Initialize Variables 
SET @PreviousDate = DATEADD(dd, - 7, GETDATE()) -- Last 7 days  
SET @Year = DATEPART(yyyy, @PreviousDate)

SELECT @MonthPre = CONVERT(VARCHAR(2), DATEPART(mm, @PreviousDate))

SELECT @Month = RIGHT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, (@MonthPre + 1000000000)), 2)

SELECT @DayPre = CONVERT(VARCHAR(2), DATEPART(dd, @PreviousDate))

SELECT @Day = RIGHT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, (@DayPre + 1000000000)), 2)

SET @FinalDate = CAST(@Year + @Month + @Day AS INT)

-- Pull Job History 
SELECT j.[name]
	,s.step_name
	,h.step_id
	,MSDB.DBO.AGENT_DATETIME(h.run_date, h.run_time) AS run_time
	,STUFF(STUFF(STUFF(RIGHT(REPLICATE('0', 8) + CAST(h.run_duration AS VARCHAR(8)), 8), 3, 0, ':'), 6, 0, ':'), 9, 0, ':') 'run_duration (DD:HH:MM:SS)  '
	,h.run_status
	,h.sql_severity
	,h.message
	,h.SERVER
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobhistory h
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobs j ON h.job_id = j.job_id
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobsteps s ON j.job_id = s.job_id
	AND h.step_id = s.step_id
WHERE h.run_date > @FinalDate
ORDER BY h.instance_id DESC

 

To get a job history for everything that has succeeded or failed over the last 7 days run the query below. Simply change the @RunStatus variable to either 0 (failed) or 1 (succeeded).

-- Variable Declarations 
DECLARE @RunStatus AS BIT
DECLARE @PreviousDate DATETIME
DECLARE @Year VARCHAR(4)
DECLARE @Month VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @MonthPre VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @Day VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @DayPre VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @FinalDate INT

/*Succeeded Jobs*/
--SET @RunStatus = 1
/*Failed Jobs*/
SET @RunStatus = 0

-- Initialize Variables 
SET @PreviousDate = DATEADD(dd, - 7, GETDATE()) -- Last 7 days  
SET @Year = DATEPART(yyyy, @PreviousDate)

SELECT @MonthPre = CONVERT(VARCHAR(2), DATEPART(mm, @PreviousDate))

SELECT @Month = RIGHT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, (@MonthPre + 1000000000)), 2)

SELECT @DayPre = CONVERT(VARCHAR(2), DATEPART(dd, @PreviousDate))

SELECT @Day = RIGHT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, (@DayPre + 1000000000)), 2)

SET @FinalDate = CAST(@Year + @Month + @Day AS INT)

-- Pull Job History 
SELECT j.[name]
	,s.step_name
	,h.step_id
	,MSDB.DBO.AGENT_DATETIME(h.run_date, h.run_time) AS run_time
	,STUFF(STUFF(STUFF(RIGHT(REPLICATE('0', 8) + CAST(h.run_duration AS VARCHAR(8)), 8), 3, 0, ':'), 6, 0, ':'), 9, 0, ':') 'run_duration (DD:HH:MM:SS)  '
	,h.run_status
	,h.sql_severity
	,h.message
	,h.SERVER
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobhistory h
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobs j ON h.job_id = j.job_id
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobsteps s ON j.job_id = s.job_id
	AND h.step_id = s.step_id
WHERE h.run_status = @RunStatus
	AND h.run_date > @FinalDate
ORDER BY h.instance_id DESC

 

If you want to generate a list of all the:

  1. jobs and their owners
  2. SSIS packages and their owners

you can do so by running the queries below. (If you don’t already know the precise name or ID of a job)

--Jobs
select s.name,l.name
 from  msdb..sysjobs s 
 left join master.sys.syslogins l on s.owner_sid = l.sid

--Packages
select s.name,l.name 
from msdb..sysssispackages s 
 left join master.sys.syslogins l on s.ownersid = l.sid

 

Once you have retrieved either the name (command) or the ID of the job you are looking for you can plug that info into either one of the queries below also.

use msdb

select *
from dbo.sysjobsteps with (nolock)
where command like '%YourJobName%'

select *
from dbo.sysjobs sj with (nolock)
where sj.job_id = '1234-1234-1234-1234-1234'

How to fix an SSRS Report that cannot find stored procedure fields or parameters while displaying the define query parameters window

When setting up your data sets in an SSRS report if you are using a complicated stored procedure, i.e. a SP which relies on dynamic SQL, temp tables or finishes with an IF statement, chances are the SSRS report will not be able to figure out what the SP returns. When this happens you will not be able to populate the data set with data.

This happens because the execution plan of the SSRS software isn’t smart enough and won’t be able to determine what fields the SP creates and therefore will not be able to create a means of storing the data on the report end.

Subsequently you’ll see the, often misleading, table below popup.

 

SSRS Pop up Define Query Parameters

The solution to stop this from happening is quite simple, but considering how expensive this software is it’s a solution that shouldn’t have to be employed.

The solution is to trick the SSRS software by simplifying the SP. Basically perform a select on the specific fields you need with no additional logic or create a table with the exact fields you need with corresponding data types and select from that.

Use this dumb SP to populate the dataset in the SSRS report.

In the “Choose a data source and create a query” window as below, click refresh fields.

SSRS window refresh fields
The software should now pick up the fields.
Change the SP back to the way it was before and do not refresh the fields again in the SSRS software and the fields should continue to populate as you need them.

How to find columns from all Tables of a Database

If your job is to create reports using SQL chances are you have or will encounter this situation:

You’ve been asked to prepare a report, but the person who has asked for the report simply has a list of fields they want and they have no idea where those fields come from. They may have received previous reports in the past, so they know the fields exist, but they cannot provide any of the SQL queries used to create these reports as an example.

You, the developer, may not be familiar with that particular area of the business or associated data sources. Possibly because you typically prepared financial reports and this request has come from the operations or marketing departments.

So the first step is to locate these columns within the database.

The following query will return the Table Name, Schema Name and Column Name from the database.

In the example below all instances where the column name equals CustomerID, OrderID, OrderDate will be returned. Also Column names that contain the word Status or Promotion will also be return. Simply change or add additional columns names as needed. 

USE [YourDatabaseName];
GO

SELECT T.NAME AS TableName
	,SCHEMA_NAME(SCHEMA_ID) AS SchemaName
	,C.NAME AS ColumnName
FROM SYS.TABLES AS t
INNER JOIN SYS.COLUMNS C ON T.OBJECT_ID = C.OBJECT_ID
WHERE C.NAME = 'CustomerID'
	OR C.NAME = 'OrderID'
	OR C.NAME = 'OrderDate'
	OR C.NAME LIKE '%Status%'
	OR C.NAME LIKE '%Promotion%'
ORDER BY SchemaName
	,TableName;

 

That should help get you started in preparing the report.