Category Archives: sql

How to determine why a T-SQL command is unreasonably slow

If you’ve ever found yourself in the situation were a command executing against a small table is nowhere near instant there can be numerous reasons for this but the most common causes are locks and waits.

The first step in identifying the problem is to execute the script below in a new query window while the troublesome command is running.

/* Queries Not Running */
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
		ORDER BY r.total_elapsed_time DESC
		) AS Rn
	,st.TEXT AS SqlText
	,r.*
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests r
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(sql_handle) AS st
WHERE r.status <> 'running';

/* Queries Running */
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
		ORDER BY r.total_elapsed_time DESC
		) AS Rn
	,st.TEXT AS SqlText
	,r.*
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests r
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(sql_handle) AS st
WHERE r.status = 'running';

 

This script will return two lists of the currently active sessions along with the stats associated with their execution. The first list will contain all the active sessions that are not running. The second list will contain all the active sessions that are running and will likely not contain the troublesome query you’re dealing with.

Identify your session based on the SqlText field. Be sure you’ve identified the session correctly as you may decide you want to kill the process later and killing the wrong one could cause you a lot of trouble.

  • status : If the status is not running look to the other fields in the returned result set to help identify the problem. If the session is in the running result set but you are unhappy with the performance it is likely the T-SQL needs to be optimized to make it run faster. This is a very broad topic and there are tons of articles and guides on the internet dealing with it.
  • blocking_session_id : If another session is blocking yours from executing, e.g. it has locked a table your command needs to write to, then this field will include the Id of the session causing the table to be locked. You can use EXEC sp_who2 to assess if the underlying command/query is experiencing a problem. If you are familiar with the blocking session you may know that you are able to kill the session without incurring any negative consequences. You can use the following code snippet to kill the blocking session.
    KILL blocking_session_id /*replace by the actual Id*/

    NOTE: Before you kill anything if it’s a command that has been running for a very long time it will likely take at least the same amount of time to roll back and unlock the table. You might be better off waiting for the session to finish on its own.

  • wait_type : If no blocking session is available, then the query is waiting for something, e.g. server resources etc. More details about wait types can be found HERE
  • wait_time : This stat value is measured in milliseconds. Short wait times are fine, specially in PAGEIOLATCH wait types (access to physical files) but longer wait times indicate a more serious problem.
  • last_wait_type : Indicates if the last wait type was different. This is quite helpful in analyzing if the query was blocked for the same reason before.

 

How to tell if you are a member of a SQL Server group or create a list of group members using T-SQL

The following scripts will help you determine if you are a member of a group or role or create a list of group members in SQL Server without having to use SQL Server Management Studio. This is a particularly handy script in determining who might have access to the server through Active Directory groups.

/*
The code below indicates whether the current user is a member 
of the specified Microsoft Windows group or SQL Server database role.
A result of 1 = yes
,0 = no
,null = the group or role queried is not valid.
*/

SELECT IS_MEMBER('[group or role]')


/*
The code below will create a list of all the logins that are members 
of a group.
*/

EXEC master..xp_logininfo 
@acctname = '[group]',
@option = 'members'

 

How to remove Logins and Users from SQL Server en masse

The script below will create SQL code to drop every user and login from a SQL Server instance. Not very useful unless you’re trying to give someone, possibly yourself, a very bad day. Don’t worry though the script does not execute the code, to reiterate it only generates it. However given the potential for you using the output of the script incorrectly this post comes with a disclaimer (Link to disclaimer).

To make the script a little more useful you can populate a temp table called #TheseUsersOnly in the script with the specific login/user names you want to remove.

This will limit the code outputted to only the logins and users specified.

Go to the /*INSERT LOGINS HERE*/ section to populate the temp table with hard coded login/user names.

Be sure to thoroughly review the code outputted before executing it.

If you encounter this error message “The database principal owns a schema in the database, and cannot be dropped“, see this post (Link).

SET NOCOUNT ON;

/*DECLARE VARIABLES*/
DECLARE @Database TABLE (DbName SYSNAME);
DECLARE @DbName AS SYSNAME;
DECLARE @sqlCommand AS VARCHAR(MAX);
DECLARE @UserName AS VARCHAR(128);
DECLARE @i AS INT;
DECLARE @z AS INT;
DECLARE @j AS INT;
DECLARE @y AS INT;

/*DROP EXISTING TEMP TABLES*/
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#ErrorTable') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	DROP TABLE #ErrorTable
END;

IF OBJECT_ID(N'tempdb..#User') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	DROP TABLE #User
END;

IF OBJECT_ID(N'tempdb..#UserOrdered') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	DROP TABLE #UserOrdered
END;

IF OBJECT_ID(N'tempdb..#TheseUsersOnly') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	DROP TABLE #TheseUsersOnly
END;

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Return') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	DROP TABLE #Return
END;

/*CREATE TEMP TABLES*/
/*THE ERROR TABLE WILL STORE THE DYNAMIC SQL THAT DID NOT WORK*/
CREATE TABLE [#ErrorTable] ([SqlCommand] VARCHAR(MAX)) ON [PRIMARY];

CREATE TABLE #User (
	Id INT NOT NULL IDENTITY(1, 1) PRIMARY KEY
	,DbName SYSNAME NULL
	,UserName SYSNAME NULL
	);

CREATE TABLE #UserOrdered (
	Id INT NOT NULL IDENTITY(1, 1) PRIMARY KEY
	,DbName SYSNAME NULL
	,UserName SYSNAME NULL
	);

CREATE TABLE #TheseUsersOnly (UserName SYSNAME NULL);

CREATE TABLE [#Return] ([SqlCommand] VARCHAR(MAX)) ON [PRIMARY];

/*INSERT LOGINS HERE*/
/*
/*Single Login*/
INSERT INTO #TheseUsersOnly (UserName)
SELECT 'Test_Login';
*/
/*
/*Multiple Logins*/
INSERT INTO #TheseUsersOnly (UserName)
VALUES (Test_Login_1)
,(Test_Login_2)
,(Test_Login_3)
*/
SET @DbName = '';

/*GENERATE LIST TABLE OF DATABASE NAMES*/
INSERT INTO @Database (DbName)
SELECT NAME
FROM master.dbo.sysdatabases
WHERE NAME <> 'tempdb'
ORDER BY NAME ASC;

/*GENERATE LIST OF USERS FOR EACH DATABASE*/
WHILE @DbName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @DbName = (
			SELECT MIN(DbName)
			FROM @Database
			WHERE DbName > @DbName
			)
	SET @sqlCommand = '
INSERT INTO #User (
DbName
,UserName
)
SELECT ' + '''' + @DbName + '''' + ' AS DbName 
,princ.name AS UserName
FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.database_principals AS princ
WHERE princ.name IS NOT NULL
';

	/*OPTION TO LIMIT USERS TO ONLY THE USERS SPECIFIED*/
	IF EXISTS (
			SELECT *
			FROM #TheseUsersOnly
			)
	BEGIN
		SET @sqlCommand = @sqlCommand + 'AND princ.Name IN (SELECT UserName FROM #TheseUsersOnly);'
	END
	ELSE
	BEGIN
		SET @sqlCommand = @sqlCommand + ';'
	END

	/*ERROR HANDLING*/
	BEGIN TRY
		EXEC (@sqlCommand)
	END TRY

	BEGIN CATCH
		INSERT INTO #ErrorTable
		SELECT (@sqlCommand)
	END CATCH
END;

/*REORDER USER TABLE BY NAME ALPHABETICALLY ASCENDING*/
INSERT INTO #UserOrdered (
	DbName
	,UserName
	)
SELECT DbName
	,UserName
FROM #User
ORDER BY UserName ASC
	,DbName ASC;

/*SET LOOP VARIABLES*/
SET @y = 0;
SET @i = 1;
SET @z = (
		SELECT COUNT(*)
		FROM #UserOrdered
		);

/*LOOP TO GENERATE SQL CODE*/
WHILE @i <= @z
BEGIN
	SELECT @DbName = DbName
		,@UserName = UserName
	FROM #UserOrdered
	WHERE Id = @i

	IF @y = 0
		SET @j = 1;

	BEGIN
		SET @y = (
				SELECT COUNT(UserName)
				FROM #UserOrdered
				WHERE UserName = @UserName
				)
	END

	SET @sqlCommand = 'USE [' + @DbName + '];
IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.database_principals WHERE name = N' + '''' + @UserName + '''' + ')
BEGIN DROP USER [' + @UserName + '] END;
';

	/*ERROR HANDLING*/
	BEGIN TRY
		INSERT INTO #Return
		SELECT (@sqlCommand)
	END TRY

	BEGIN CATCH
		INSERT INTO #ErrorTable
		SELECT (@sqlCommand)
	END CATCH

	IF @j = @y
	BEGIN
		IF EXISTS (
				SELECT NAME
				FROM master.sys.server_principals
				WHERE NAME = @UserName
				)
		BEGIN
			INSERT INTO #Return (SqlCommand)
			SELECT 'USE [master];
IF EXISTS (SELECT NAME
FROM master.sys.server_principals
WHERE NAME = ' + '''' + @UserName + '''' + '
) BEGIN
DROP LOGIN [' + @UserName + '] END;'
		END

		SET @y = 0;
	END

	SET @i = @i + 1;
	SET @j = @j + 1;
END

/*RESULTS*/
SELECT SqlCommand
FROM #ErrorTable;

SELECT SqlCommand
FROM #Return;

/*HOUSEKEEPING*/
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#ErrorTable') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	DROP TABLE #ErrorTable
END;

IF OBJECT_ID(N'tempdb..#User') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	DROP TABLE #User
END;

IF OBJECT_ID(N'tempdb..#UserOrdered') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	DROP TABLE #UserOrdered
END;

IF OBJECT_ID(N'tempdb..#TheseUsersOnly') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	DROP TABLE #TheseUsersOnly
END;

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Return') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	DROP TABLE #Return
END;

 

How to get the default error log path for SQL Server with T-SQL

Below is a script to get the default error log path for SQL Server and set it as a variable. 

USE MASTER;
GO

DECLARE @LogPath AS VARCHAR(MAX)
DECLARE @ErrorLogPath TABLE (
	LogDate DATETIME
	,ProcessInfo VARCHAR(255)
	,PathText VARCHAR(MAX)
	);

INSERT INTO @ErrorLogPath
EXEC xp_readerrorlog 0
	,1
	,N'Logging SQL Server messages in file';

SET @LogPath = (
		SELECT REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(PathText, 'Logging SQL Server messages in file ', ''), '''', ''), 'ERRORLOG.', '')
		FROM @ErrorLogPath
		);

SELECT @LogPath AS DefaultLogPath;
GO

 

How to search for SQL Server objects that exist anywhere across an instance using T-SQL

You’re probably never going to be familiar with every database object, i.e. Table, View, Stored Procedure and Function, that exists in a large production database, even if you were the one who designed it. So everyone who maintains an environment be it a call center back end or sales system back end or CRM back end etc. etc. needs to be able to locate objects quickly.

Redgate offer a fantastic free tool to do this within SQL Server Management Studio through a GUI called SQL Search.

As great as this is though sometimes you might want to search through object definitions programmatically.

To clarify I’m defining object definition as being column names of a table or view or the command that makes up a stored procedure or function.

Below is the Store Procedure I’ve written to do this called SearchObjectDefinition. To work this Stored Procedure also requires the User Defined Function (UDF) called Split which I used in the tutorial “How to pass a multi-value parameter to a stored procedure from a SSRS Report“.

Below are a few use cases for SearchObjectDefinition:

--List All Instance Tables, Stored Procedures, Views and Functions
EXEC dbo.SearchObjectDefinition

--List All Stored Procedures, and Functions in the Databases 
--TestDatabaseOne and TestDatabaseTwo
EXEC dbo.SearchObjectDefinition @ObjectType = 'Sp, Fn'
	,@DatabaseName = 'TestDatabaseOne, TestDatabaseTwo'

--List All Instance Tables, Stored Procedures, Views and Functions 
--where Object Definition contains the word Insert
EXEC dbo.SearchObjectDefinition @strFind = 'insert'

--List All Instance Tables where Object Name is Customers and 
--Column name contains the word Phone
EXEC dbo.SearchObjectDefinition @ObjectType = 'tb'
	,@ObjectName = 'Customers'
	,@strFind = 'Phone'

As always be sure to deploy the following Function and Store Procedure in a utility database not the master database as this is bad practice.

Split Function:

--USE [DatabaseName];
--GO

IF OBJECT_ID('[Split]') IS NULL
	EXEC ('CREATE FUNCTION dbo.[Split](@i INT) RETURNS @RtnValue TABLE (j INT) AS BEGIN INSERT INTO @RtnValue (j) SELECT 1 RETURN END');
GO

ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[Split] (
	@List NVARCHAR(2000)
	,@SplitOn NVARCHAR(5)
	)
RETURNS @RtnValue TABLE (
	Id INT identity(1, 1)
	,Value NVARCHAR(100)
	)
AS
BEGIN
	WHILE (Charindex(@SplitOn, @List) > 0)
	BEGIN
		INSERT INTO @RtnValue (value)
		SELECT Value = ltrim(rtrim(Substring(@List, 1, Charindex(@SplitOn, @List) - 1)))

		SET @List = Substring(@List, Charindex(@SplitOn, @List) + len(@SplitOn), len(@List))
	END

	INSERT INTO @RtnValue (Value)
	SELECT Value = ltrim(rtrim(@List))

	RETURN
END

SearchObjectDefinition Stored Procedure:

--USE [DatabaseName];
--GO

IF OBJECT_ID('[SearchObjectDefinition]') IS NULL
	EXEC ('CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.[SearchObjectDefinition] AS SELECT 1')
GO

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[SearchObjectDefinition] (
	@ObjectType AS VARCHAR(20) = NULL
	,@ObjectName AS SYSNAME = NULL
	,@DatabaseName AS SYSNAME = NULL
	,@strFind AS VARCHAR(MAX) = NULL
	)
AS
BEGIN
	SET NOCOUNT ON;
	SET @strFind = ISNULL(@strFind, '')
	SET @ObjectName = ISNULL(@ObjectName, '')

	IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Result') IS NOT NULL
		DROP TABLE #Result;

	DECLARE @DatabaseTable TABLE (DbName SYSNAME)
	DECLARE @DbName AS SYSNAME
	DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

	CREATE TABLE #Result (
		DbName SYSNAME NULL
		,ObjectType VARCHAR(2)
		,ObjectName SYSNAME
		,ObjectDefinition VARCHAR(MAX)
		)

	IF @DatabaseName IS NOT NULL
	BEGIN
		INSERT INTO @DatabaseTable (DbName)
		SELECT Value
		FROM dbo.Split(@DatabaseName, ',')
	END

	IF @DatabaseName IS NULL
	BEGIN
		INSERT INTO @DatabaseTable (DbName)
		SELECT NAME
		FROM master.dbo.sysdatabases
		WHERE NAME NOT IN (
				'tempdb'
				,'master'
				,'msdb'
				,'model'
				)
		ORDER BY NAME ASC
	END

	SET @DbName = ''

	--TO FIND STRING IN ALL PROCEDURES  
	IF @ObjectType LIKE '%Sp%'
		OR @ObjectType IS NULL
	BEGIN
		WHILE @DbName IS NOT NULL
		BEGIN
			SET @DbName = (
					SELECT MIN(DbName)
					FROM @DatabaseTable
					WHERE DbName > @DbName
					)
			SET @Sql = '
			USE ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + ';
			
			INSERT INTO #Result (
				DbName
				,ObjectType
				,ObjectName
				,ObjectDefinition
				)
			SELECT ''' + @DbName + ''' AS DbName
				,''Sp'' AS ObjectType
				,OBJECT_NAME(OBJECT_ID) AS ObjectName
				,OBJECT_DEFINITION(OBJECT_ID) AS ObjectDefinition
			FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.procedures
			WHERE OBJECT_DEFINITION(OBJECT_ID) LIKE ''%'' + ''' + @strFind + ''' + ''%''
			AND Name LIKE ''%'' + ''' + @ObjectName + ''' + ''%''
			'

			EXEC (@Sql)
		END
	END

	SET @DbName = ''

	--TO FIND STRING IN ALL VIEWS   
	IF @ObjectType LIKE '%Vw%'
		OR @ObjectType IS NULL
	BEGIN
		WHILE @DbName IS NOT NULL
		BEGIN
			SET @DbName = (
					SELECT MIN(DbName)
					FROM @DatabaseTable
					WHERE DbName > @DbName
					)
			SET @Sql = '
		USE ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + ';	
		
		INSERT INTO #Result (
			DbName
			,ObjectType
			,ObjectName
			,ObjectDefinition
			)
		SELECT ''' + @DbName + ''' AS DbName
			,''Vw'' AS ObjectType
			,OBJECT_NAME(OBJECT_ID) AS ObjectName
			,OBJECT_DEFINITION(OBJECT_ID) AS ObjectDefinition
		FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.VIEWS
		WHERE OBJECT_DEFINITION(OBJECT_ID) LIKE ''%'' + ''' + @strFind + ''' + ''%''
		AND Name LIKE ''%'' + ''' + @ObjectName + ''' + ''%''
			'

			EXEC (@Sql)
		END
	END

	SET @DbName = ''

	--TO FIND STRING IN ALL FUNCTION 
	IF @ObjectType LIKE '%Fn%'
		OR @ObjectType IS NULL
	BEGIN
		WHILE @DbName IS NOT NULL
		BEGIN
			SET @DbName = (
					SELECT MIN(DbName)
					FROM @DatabaseTable
					WHERE DbName > @DbName
					)
			SET @Sql = '
		USE ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + ';	
		
		INSERT INTO #Result (
			DbName
			,ObjectType
			,ObjectName
			,ObjectDefinition
			)
		SELECT ''' + @DbName + ''' AS DbName
			,''Fn'' AS ObjectType
			,ROUTINE_NAME AS ObjectName
			,ROUTINE_DEFINITION AS ObjectDefinition
		FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES
		WHERE ROUTINE_DEFINITION LIKE ''%'' + ''' + @strFind + ''' + ''%''
			AND ROUTINE_NAME LIKE ''%'' + ''' + @ObjectName + ''' + ''%''
			AND ROUTINE_TYPE = ''FUNCTION''
		ORDER BY ROUTINE_NAME
			'

			EXEC (@Sql)
		END
	END

	SET @DbName = ''

	--TO FIND STRING IN ALL TABLES OF DATABASE.  
	IF @ObjectType LIKE '%Tb%'
		OR @ObjectType IS NULL
	BEGIN
		WHILE @DbName IS NOT NULL
		BEGIN
			SET @DbName = (
					SELECT MIN(DbName)
					FROM @DatabaseTable
					WHERE DbName > @DbName
					)
			SET @Sql = '
		USE ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + ';	
			
		INSERT INTO #Result (
			DbName
			,ObjectType
			,ObjectName
			,ObjectDefinition
			)
		SELECT ''' + @DbName + ''' AS DbName
			,''Tb'' AS ObjectType
			,t.NAME AS ObjectName
			,c.NAME AS ObjectDefinition
		FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.tables AS t
		INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.columns c ON t.OBJECT_ID = c.OBJECT_ID
		WHERE c.NAME LIKE ''%'' + ''' + @strFind + ''' + ''%''
		AND t.Name LIKE ''%'' + ''' + @ObjectName + ''' + ''%''
		ORDER BY [ObjectDefinition] ASC
			'

			EXEC (@Sql)
		END
	END

	SELECT DbName
		,ObjectType
		,ObjectName
		,ObjectDefinition
	FROM #Result
	ORDER BY DbName ASC
		,ObjectType ASC
		,ObjectName ASC

	DROP TABLE #Result
END

 

How to assess T-SQL code quickly

I’m sure you’re an excellent SQL coder writing beautiful efficient queries, but your predecessor . . . well they might have just been lucky to have a job.

Going through someone else’s bad code is usually tiresome, tedious and often very confusing.

I’ve created the T-SQL Assessor excel file to help in this task.

DOWNLOAD (Dropbox link)

The assessor will colour code the sql to highlight the lines of importance. With the Key Word column you can then simply filter to words like INSERT, UPDATE, MERGE and EXEC to see where the data is going or filter the column by the word FROM to see where the data has come from.

To use the T-SQL Assessor file you will first have to format your code using Poor Man’s T-SQL Formatter. This excellent tool can be installed in Visual Studio, SQL Server Management Studio or Notepad++.

http://architectshack.com/PoorMansTSqlFormatter.ashx

You can also use the online option:

http://poorsql.com/

Poor Man’s T-SQL Formatter makes text that contains a SQL command a new line, so you can’t have INSERT and FROM on one line. This is what allows Excel formula’s to highlight the lines with key words as each line can only contain one key word, excluding comments.

Once the code is formatted simply paste it into the first sheet of the file, “SQL”.

That’s it, all the work is then done for you on the second sheet of the file, “SQL Assessed”

T-SQL Assessor is also great at preparing a report from a schema compare script created by Visual Studio. It’s very annoying Microsoft didn’t provide a way of exporting the comparison directly into excel the way Redgate did but this will help. Simply filter the file to only include the keywords.

DOWNLOAD (Dropbox link)

How to disable all enabled user job schedules in SQL Server with T-Sql

I’d really recommend not running the output of this script on a live environment! This is just a little something I whipped up to test on a development environment.

Running the below script will output the T-Sql required to disable all enabled job schedules on the SQL Server instance. Just copy the outputted text and paste into a new SSMS window and execute to disable the jobs.

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Schedule TABLE (ScheduleId INT)
DECLARE @ScheduleId AS INT
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @ScheduleId = ''

INSERT INTO @Schedule (ScheduleId)
SELECT s.schedule_id
FROM msdb.dbo.sysschedules AS s
WHERE s.[enabled] = 1
	AND s.owner_sid <> 0x01
ORDER BY s.NAME ASC

WHILE @ScheduleId IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @ScheduleId = (
			SELECT MIN(ScheduleId)
			FROM @Schedule
			WHERE ScheduleId > @ScheduleId
			)
	SET @Sql = '
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_update_schedule @schedule_id = ' + '''' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(5), @ScheduleId) + '''' + '
	,@enabled = 0; 
'

	PRINT @Sql
END

How to run all enabled SQL Server Jobs with T-Sql

I’d really recommend not running the output of this script on a live environment! This is just a little something I whipped up to test changes on a development environment.

Running the script will output the T-Sql required to run all jobs on the SQL Server instance. Just copy the text and paste into a new SSMS window and execute. You could change the PRINT to EXEC but I wouldn’t recommend it.

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Job TABLE (JobName SYSNAME)
DECLARE @JobName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @JobName = ''

INSERT INTO @Job (JobName)
SELECT j.NAME
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS j
WHERE j.[enabled] = 1
ORDER BY j.NAME ASC

WHILE @JobName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @JobName = (
			SELECT MIN(JobName)
			FROM @Job
			WHERE JobName > @JobName
			)
	SET @Sql = '
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_start_job @job_name = ' + '''' + @JobName + '''' + '; 
'
	PRINT @Sql
END