Tag Archives: instructions

How to pass arguments from command line to a console application written in C#

This is a simple tutorial on passing arguments or parameter values from command line to a console application written in C#. Using the example below you should be able to edit and expand on the logic to fit your own needs.

First you’ll need to create a new Visual Studio C# console application, to do so follow these steps:

To create and run a console application

  1. Start Visual Studio.

  2. On the menu bar, choose FileNewProject.
  3. Expand Installed, expand Templates, expand Visual C#, and then choose Console Application.
  4. In the Name box, specify a name for your project, and then choose the OK button.
  5. If Program.cs isn’t open in the Code Editor, open the shortcut menu for Program.cs in Solution Explorer, and then choose View Code.
  6. Replace the contents of Program.cs with the following code.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace TestArgsInput
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            if (args.Length == 0)
            {
				// Display message to user to provide parameters.
                System.Console.WriteLine("Please enter parameter values.");
                Console.Read();
            }
            else
            {
                // Loop through array to list args parameters.
                for (int i = 0; i < args.Length; i++)
                {
                    Console.Write(args[i] + Environment.NewLine);
                    
                }
                // Keep the console window open after the program has run.
                Console.Read();
            }
        }
    }
}

 

The Main method is the entry point of a C# application. When the application is started, the Main method is the first method that is invoked.

The parameter of the Main method is a String array that represents the command-line arguments. Usually you determine whether arguments exist by testing the Length property as in the example above.

When run the example above will list out the parameters you have provided to the command window. The delimiter for command line separating arguments or parameter values is a single space. For example the following would be interpreted as two arguments or parameter values:

“This is parameter 1” “This is parameter 2”

If the arguments were not enclosed by double quotes each word would be considered an argument.

To pass arguments to the console application when testing the application logic the arguments can be written into the debug section of the project properties as shown below.

TestArgs

So using the if the app is run with the command line arguments provided as above in the image the command window will list:
Parameter 1
Parameter 2
If you would like to know how to create a console application in Visual Studio that won’t open a command window when it runs see this tutorial link.
If you would like to know how to create a csv file with C# see this tutorial link.

How to create Clustered and Nonclustered Indexes on a Temp Table

One of the best features of temp tables is that an index can be applied to them.

To clarify temp tables start with #, exist within the tempdb and are accessible within child batches (nested triggers, procedure, exec calls) of the query.

The execution plan can also determine the relevant statistics regarding their operation and suggest means of optimisation and will often suggest applying an index to the table.
Below is a simple example of applying both clustered and nonclustered indexes to the temporary table #Apostle created from a CTE (Common Table Expression).

 

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Apostle') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #Apostle;

WITH CTE
AS (
	SELECT 1 AS ID
		,'Simon Peter' AS NAME
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 2
		,'James'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 3
		,'John'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 4
		,'Andrew'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 5
		,'Philip'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 6
		,'Thomas'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 7
		,'Bartholomew'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 8
		,'Matthew'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 9
		,'James'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 10
		,'Simon'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 11
		,'Thaddaeus'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 12
		,'Judas'
	)
SELECT *
INTO #Apostle
FROM CTE

-- CREATE INDEXES
CREATE CLUSTERED INDEX IDX_CLUSTERED_ID ON #Apostle (ID)

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IDX_NONCLUSTERED_ID ON #Apostle (ID)

 

Microsoft defines clustered and nonclustered indexes as the following:

Clustered

  • Clustered indexes sort and store the data rows in the table or view based on their key values. These are the columns included in the index definition. There can be only one clustered index per table, because the data rows themselves can be sorted in only one order.
  • The only time the data rows in a table are stored in sorted order is when the table contains a clustered index. When a table has a clustered index, the table is called a clustered table. If a table has no clustered index, its data rows are stored in an unordered structure called a heap.

Nonclustered

  • Nonclustered indexes have a structure separate from the data rows. A nonclustered index contains the nonclustered index key values and each key value entry has a pointer to the data row that contains the key value.
  • The pointer from an index row in a nonclustered index to a data row is called a row locator. The structure of the row locator depends on whether the data pages are stored in a heap or a clustered table. For a heap, a row locator is a pointer to the row. For a clustered table, the row locator is the clustered index key.
  • You can add nonkey columns to the leaf level of the nonclustered index to by-pass existing index key limits, 900 bytes and 16 key columns, and execute fully covered, indexed, queries.

Source

To learn more about indexes this is a good video on the topic.